Research Grants

Instructions to Applicants | Preferred Research Areas

Preferred Research Areas

  • History
    • Researches that re-visit and re-shape the historical narrative (or parts thereof) through a genealogical lens – for example:
      • “A Generational History of the Jews of (Vienna)(Fez)(Salonika) (wherever), as seen through a Genealogical Prism”.
    • Studies that offer a broader perspective on specific genealogical topics – for example:
      • “An Overview of the Kinship Relationships of Conversos (Marranos) and the Geographical Dispersion of their Families over time”.
    • Integrative studies placing Jewish Genealogical researches into context of the wider historical narrative, both Jewish and non-Jewish
      • A comparison of the family histories of Jews and non-Jews in feudal Poland.
  • Rabbinics
    • “holistic” (rather than particularist) and critical approaches to rabbinical genealogies – for example:
      • “A re-construction of the family ties of rabbis across broad geographical areas, reflecting the posts they held (“Ashkenaz”; Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; North Africa)”;
      • “A Critical Re-examination of Major Rabbinical Lineages”.
  • Onomastics
    • Application of recently developed tools for the classification and analysis of Jewish names to regions/communities where little or no scholarly work has been done – for example:
      • In North Africa, Turkey, Arabic-speaking lands, Persia, Romania, Hungary, Bohemia-Moravia, Alsace-Lorraine, Yemen, Ethiopia, India, etc.
      • Broader canvassing and compiling of names from under-utilised sources, particularly from regions of the kind mentioned above, leading to the “mapping” of these names, studies of their frequency, permutations, etc.
  • Studies highlighting Interdisciplinary Aspects of JG
    • JG and Sociology – for example:
      • Studies of changing family structures and social values, notions of “class” and the criteria therefor, with resultant impacts on family connections.
    • JG and Migration Studies – for example:
      • Overview analyses of major migration movements, including . internal migration, in various regions, from a genealogical point of view
    • JG and Genetics – for example:
      • Genetic/DNA Studies of “Closed” Jewish Communities, e.g. in Djerba, Tunisia; on the Island of Rhodes, Georgia, etc.
    • JG and Demography
    • JG and Statistics
      • Large scale statistical studies of family groups, emigrations/ immigrations, with detailed analyses of family structures (age differences of spouses; including frequency of consanguinity; infant mortality; life expectancy; medical issues; hereditary diseases; given names; name changes; etc.)
  • JG and Computer Science (technologies)
    • Development of research tools of fundamental importance to JG – for example:
      • Updating and broadening of the DM Soundex far beyond East European names and phonetics.
  • Sources
    • Studies aimed at the systematic identification and documentation of new/under-utilized/previously inaccessible sources and resources for Jewish Genealogy – for example:
      • Notarial records in pre-Expulsion Iberia.
      • Municipal records throughout Italy prior to the establishment of the ghettos.